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Field evaluation of spray programs for management of anthracnose fruit rot of blueberry

By: Jonathan E. Oliver (UGA Fruit Pathologist), James Jacobs (UGA County Extension Coordinator, Pierce, Charlton, and Brantley Counties), Zack Williams (UGA County Extension Agent, Bacon County), Renee Holland (UGA Area Extension Agent – Commercial Blueberry) Background Anthracnose fruit rot of blueberry is caused by the fungi Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum…
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Multisite Fungicides for Fungicide Resistance Management in Blueberries

In conventional blueberry production, fungicides are frequently used to manage blueberry diseases. Unfortunately, as a result of repeated fungicide usage, the fungi targeted by these chemicals can develop resistance to specific fungicide modes of action.  This ultimately can make these fungicides less effective for disease management.  To reduce the chances…
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Postharvest Keeping Quality of Southern Highbush, Rabbiteye, and Northern Highbush Blueberry Cultivars in Cold Storage

Part 1: Fruit Firmness Authors: Rion T. Mooneyham, Savithri U. Nambeesan, and Rachel A. Itle  This article is the first of a series from my master’s research.  Overall, this work is the examination and comparison of fruit quality traits in southern highbush (SHB), rabbiteye (RE), and northern highbush (NHB) cultivars in…
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Fruit Splits and Yeast Rot in Blueberries

As a follow-up on Dr. Sial’s post from last week, I have also received several calls from Extension Agents about the prevalence of soft fruit and fruit splits. Furthermore, in addition to reports of berry splits, we’ve received reports that yeast rot has been found affecting some of this fruit….
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Fly Infestations in Blueberries

Over the past few days, I have received several calls from Extension Agents about prevalence of soft fruit, vertical fruit split, small berry size and some reports of worms in the fruit. Although it is difficult to determine the exact reasons, the unusual weather patterns we have experienced this year including warm winters, low night-temperatures lingering late in the season, and excessive rain events over the past few weeks may have contributed to these issues. A number rain events during the harvest above all increase the risk of fly infestations in blueberries. Of course, spotted-wing drosophila (SWD) is our Suspect No. 1 and the most common fly pest that can infest berries. Although not as common, blueberry maggot (BBM), is another fly which is a quarantine pest and can infest berries during similar weather conditions. It is also quite possible that both SWD and BBM infestations may be present in the same field. In that case, correct identification is critical before implementing management strategies.

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