Alfredo Martinez and Stephanie Butcher

  • Turfgrass Disease Update – Gray Leaf Spot

    UGA Department of Plant Pathology and UGA County Extension Coordinator Coweta County GA Turfgrass disease samples keep coming to our Department of Plant Pathology Plant Disease Clinics. Gray leaf spot (GLS) is showing up now, which is earlier than historically seen and a bit further north (Coweta County) than expected for this time of the…

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  • Bristly Roseslugs: Biology and Management

    Bristly roseslug sawfly, Cladius difformis (Fig. 1), is a common species of roseslug in Georgia. The larval stages feed on rose leaves and cause extensive damage. Native to Europe, the bristly roseslug sawfly was accidentally introduced to the continental USA, a few decades ago. This roseslug is particularly problematic on rose shrubs in ornamental landscapes. Another roseslug common in the southeastern…

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  • The spotted lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula (White) (Fig. 1), is a non-native planthopper that can feed on a wide range of trees in the USA. SLF is native to China, India, and Vietnam and was first detected in Pennsylvania in September 2014. Since its initial detection, SLF has been confirmed in 12 additional states: New…

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  • The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, ALB; Fig. 1) is an invasive insect pest native to China and North and South Korea that threatens many hardwood trees in forests and landscapes in the USA. The pest is also referred to as the roundheaded borer because the segment below the head is round-shaped. The larval stages of ALB…

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  • Owning or caring for a tall fescue lawn? Bentgrass green in the golf course? Then it’s time to scout for Brown patch (caused by Rhizoctonia solani) and Pythium blight (caused by Pythium spp). These diseases are often the most serious diseases on cool season grasses, especially on tall fescue, bentgrass and ryegrass in Georgia. Brown…

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  • Juniper Scale: Biology and Management

    The juniper scale, Carulaspic juniperi (Fig. 1), is a sporadic pest of juniper, cypress, and cedar trees in nurseries and landscapes in Georgia. Native to Europe, the juniper scale is now widespread in the eastern US. It is an armored scale where the wax cover is not a part of the insect body but rather…

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  • The box tree moth, Cydalima perspectalis (Fig. 1) is an invasive pest of boxwood (Buxus spp.). It was introduced in New York in 2021 and is now reported in Michigan, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and South Carolina—and a distribution center in Tennessee. It is not reported in Georgia. The native range of box tree moth…

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  • Wax Scale: Biology and Management

    Scale insects are very common pests of landscape trees and shrubs yet are often overlooked when scouting. They can, however, be responsible for chlorosis, branch dieback, or, ultimately, death of the plant. Wax scales fall into the soft scale group as they produce soft, cottony, powdery, or waxy covers that cannot be separated from the…

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  • Dogwood borer: Larvae can eat the bark

    The dogwood borer, Synanthedon scitula (Harris), can be a destructive pest of many ornamental trees in nurseries and landscapes. Adults of dogwood borer are moths (Fig. 1). Because the wings of these moths are clear, they are referred to as clearwing moths. The name “dogwood borer” was derived because they readily attack flowering dogwood, Cornus florida L., common in…

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  • Predation in turfgrass: How is it distributed within canopy?

    The aesthetic and commercial value of turfgrass can be jeopardized by feeding or the mere presence of insect pests (Potter and Braman 1991). If we take a vertical section of turfgrass, it can be broadly subdivided into three zones – above ground, thatch, and below ground (Williamson et al. 2015). Many pest insects occupy and…

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