Southeastern Ornamental Horticulture Production and Integrated Pest Management

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CEU/WORKSHOP for Growers — Nursery and Greenhouse: Water Treatment and Quality Workshop

Sarah White, Clemson University

 

When/Where: Davidson and Huntersville, North Carolina. January 26 2012, 9 a.m. to 4.15 p.m.

You will learn how to:

  • Manage plant pathogens, algae, biofilm, and salt problems in irrigation water
  • Use chemical or cultural approaches to treat water, based on presentations from industry and university experts

 

Benefit from:

  • Pesticide CEU’s (application in process for NC and SC)
  • Booklet provided on water treatment—free with registration
  • Touring two leading growers: Turtle Creek Nursery and Metrolina Greenhouses

Who should attend: Personnel from nurseries, greenhouses and associated industries, extension agents

Low Registration Cost: Only $44 per person if pre-registered by 12 January. $59 after 12 January. See attached registration form for details. Preregistration is required for lunch.

 

Program:

9.00 Meet at Turtle Creek Nursery, 12037 Mooresville Road, Davidson, NC 28036; Tel 704 663-3154

9.00-9.15 Introductions and goals for the day (Paul Fisher, University of Florida [UF]); Welcome from North Carolina State University (NCSU) and Clemson University

9.15-10.30 Tour Turtle Creek Nursery—including presentation on management of algae by NCSU

10.30-11.00 Drive to Metrolina Greenhouses, 16400 Huntersville-Concord Road, Huntersville, NC 28078; Tel 704 948 3974

11.00-11.30 Biology of water-borne plant pathogens (Kelly Ivors, NCSU)

11.30-12.30 Selecting water treatment options (Paul Fisher, UF)

12.30-1.30 Lunch—including displays by water treatment companies

1.30-1.40 Website resources (Rosa Raudales, UF)

1.40-2.00 Algaecides for managing species of Phytophthora (Steve Jeffers, Clemson University)

2.00-2.30 Ecological alternatives for water treatment (Sarah White, Clemson University)

2.45-4.15 Tour Metrolina Greenhouses—including presentation on water use in herbaceous propagation (Jim Faust, Clemson University) and managing salt, pH, and alkalinity (Brian Whipker, NCSU)

 

Speakers and Topics

Algae management in irrigation ponds, 30 mins; Rob Richardson, Ph.D., North Caroline State University

Best management practices will be described for management of irrigation catchment basins.  A combination of pond design, managing nutrient levels, algaecides, and cultural practices reduce algae levels in ponds.  These BMPs can improve the quality of water applied to nursery crops and make it more feasible to reduce runoff of water, fertilizers, and pesticides from the nursery property.

 

Biology of waterborne plant pathogens, 30 mins; Kelly Ivors, Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Dr. Ivors will discuss the biology and ecology of plant pathogens that are problematic in irrigation water, mainly focusing on Phytophthora and Pythium species. The life cycle, survivability, and various spore types of these pathogens will be reviewed in order to understand their risks associated with ornamental plant health.

 

Selecting water treatment options, 60 mins; Paul Fisher, Ph.D., University of Florida

A challenge for growers is how to select from and implement several options for controlling plant pathogens and other water-related issues.  Chemical and physical technologies (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, copper ionization, copper salts, filtration, ultraviolet radiation) will be discussed, in terms of efficacy, ease of use, interactions with water chemistry and fertilizers, and installation and operation cost.

 

Rosa Raudales, Ph.D. student and research assistant, University of Florida

Website resources for growers on control of water quality issues, including plant pathogens, algae, biolfim, alkalinity, and salts are available at the www.watereducationalliance.org website.

 

Algaecides for managing species of Phytophthora, 20 mins; Steve Jeffers, Ph.D., Clemson University

New research will be presented on the effect of pond algaecides on Phytophthora levels in irrigation water.

 

Ecological Alternatives for Water Treatment, 30 mins; Sarah A. White, Ph.D., Clemson University

Protecting and enhancing the quality of water used to irrigate ornamental crops is increasingly essential. Contaminant removal from nursery and greenhouse water via ecological (non-chemical) treatment options is one means of improving water quality while reducing operation dependence on chemical treatments.  The basic principles controlling agrichemical, sediment, and biotic (pathogen, weed, etc.) contaminant removal by vegetative buffers, constructed wetlands, floating wetlands, and slow sand filters will be discussed.

 

Water Testing for Nutrients, Brian Whipker, NC State University, 20 mins
The most important elements to measure when it comes to chemical water quality are pH, EC and alkalinity levels.  These factors affect plant nutrition, and also interact with treatment technologies for plant pathogens.  A quick demonstration will show you how easy it is to monitor these parameters in house.

 

Water use in herbaceous propagation, 20 mins; James Faust, Ph.D. Clemson University

Over-application of water is a major cause of disease issues and crop losses during propagation.  Learn how to fine tune your irrigation practices to only provide the water your crop needs, using tools such as VPD and measuring the volume of applied water.

Protecting and enhancing the quality of water used to irrigate ornamental crops is increasingly essential. Contaminant removal from nursery and greenhouse water via ecological (non-chemical) treatment options is one means of improving water quality while reducing operation dependence on chemical treatments.  The basic principles controlling agrichemical, sediment, and biotic (pathogen, weed, etc.) contaminant removal by vegetative buffers, constructed wetlands, floating wetlands, and slow sand filters will be discussed.

 

Water Testing for Nutrients, Brian Whipker, NC State University, 20 mins

The most important elements to measure when it comes to chemical water quality are pH, EC and alkalinity levels.  These factors affect plant nutrition, and also interact with treatment technologies for plant pathogens.  A quick demonstration will show you how easy it is to monitor these parameters in house.

 

 

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